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At 10 years old, Pascual Garcia Martinez became one with mezcal. Through the helping hands of his father, Garcia Martinez, now 61 and of Santa Ana, sleeps right by the product he produces. "I'm fortunate to be able to make what I love and live from it... it's something not many people here in Mexico are able to do," Garcia Martinez said. But that may be changing. Over the last few years, a spike in popularity across large swaths of the United States has put a strain on what was only produced for small towns throughout rural Mexico just five years ago.

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At 10 years old, Pascual Garcia Martinez became one with mezcal. Through the helping hands of his father, Garcia Martinez, now 61 and of Santa Ana, sleeps right by the product he produces. "I'm fortunate to be able to make what I love and live from it... it's something not many people here in Mexico are able to do," Garcia Martinez said. But that may be changing. Over the last few years, a spike in popularity across large swaths of the United States has put a strain on what was only produced for small towns throughout rural Mexico just five years ago.